16th October: World Food Day

Today is World Food Day.

The plight of the world’s hungry is brought to our attention every year on this day. This year’s bitter pill is even harder to swallow as the number of people who experience hunger has risen more than previous years. This is due to rising food prices, food shortages and the world economic crisis.

There is an estimated increase of 105 million hungry people in 2009; consequently there are now 1.02 billion malnourished people in the world, meaning that almost one sixth of all humanity is suffering from hunger!

The future doesn’t look so rosy either, if one begins to contemplate things like climate change and the extreme weather conditions that many developing countries have been experiencing these last few months. Not forgetting the use of agricultural land for biofuel crops rather than food crops.   This year’s World Food Day theme is right on target with it’s “Achieving food security in times of crisis”.

A High-Level Forum on “How to feed the World 2050” has just been held at the UN agency of FAO which looked at examined policy options that governments should consider adopting to ensure that the world population can be fed when it nears its peak of nearly 9.2 billion people in the middle of this century. Another committee, the Committee on World Food Security is now meeting at FAO (14-17th October) to considered reforms that will enable it to play a much more effective role in the global governance of food security.

Click here for more information on World Food Day

Please also see an earlier post we did on the World Hunger Report

What are your thoughts? We’ve been battling this problem of hunger for decades now – what do you think can be done either on a local or international level to give needy people access to food?

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About Bioversity Library

Maintained by staff at Bioversity International Library, this blog aims to provide readers with updates on new information resources within the field of plant genetic resources (PGR), agrobiodiversity and conservation; [with a little fun thrown in as well].
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